Along the Road

My mind thought back to the events of the day. A day of presenting balanced literacy to an elementary staff, K-2 in the morning and 3-5 in the afternoon. Analyzing each group’s reception of the information presented and pondering where to take them next when I return. I have eighty miles of time to think this through.

Suddenly, there is movement ahead. My senses heightened and my speed decreases as I zoom closer to the movement. It is a young fawn who has stepped out of the thick brush that lines the road.

Each step taken with deliberate care. No quick movements for this young fawn. A multitude of spots spilling down its back. The head upright, watching. Eyes wary. It steps closer to the highway. It pauses. Is that confusion or wonder in the fawn’s eyes, as my car speeds past.

My mind no longer thinking of my day. Now my thoughts are questions. Where is your mother? Will you continue on your way across the road or did the sounds of the cars frighten you back to the woods? I watch my rear view mirror as another car follows me. That car has not stopped, so I hope the fawn stood its ground or dashed away.

My thoughts linger on that fawn for many miles, hoping it returned to the woods where it might be safer. Eventually, my thoughts returned to my day, hoping the teachers won’t always stay in their safe zone, but try some new ideas.

 

 

Advertisements

19 thoughts on “Along the Road

  1. Arne Jessen says:

    Thanks!  Great creative writing! From: elsie tries writing To: arnemeryl@yahoo.com Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2015 10:52 AM Subject: [New post] Along the Road #yiv1705192150 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv1705192150 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv1705192150 a.yiv1705192150primaryactionlink:link, #yiv1705192150 a.yiv1705192150primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv1705192150 a.yiv1705192150primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv1705192150 a.yiv1705192150primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv1705192150 WordPress.com | elsie posted: “My mind thought back to the events of the day. A day of presenting balanced literacy to an elementary staff, K-2 in the morning and 3-5 in the afternoon. Analyzing each group’s reception of the information presented and pondering where to take them ne” | |

  2. Love this slice – from your musings about the day, your concern over the fawn, and then your connection back to the teachers you’re hoping to nudge out of their safety zones!

  3. You are the observer! Always noticing what so many don’t. That’s a skill few have. An invaluable one for a teacher and a writer. And I wonder, where is his mama!?

  4. That fawn was a little gift of mindfulness at the end of a busy, exciting day of professional development! I loved how she grabbed your attention – and your empathy! I loved these lines especially, “My mind no longer thinking of my day. Now my thoughts are questions. Where is your mother?”

  5. So many accidents happen because of animals crossing, & so many animals die, too. I hope that fawn moved back into the woods, & am glad you are safe, too. I like that you pushed the story into the teachers’ lives too. Great connection!

  6. Jaana says:

    Trying new ideas can be so scary! I hope to try a few and engage some of my fellow teachers to join me! Hopefully we will not have too many roadblocks on our way!

  7. Love the connection here, elsie! As the new year begins, I also hope to be able to step out of my safety zone to try some new things. My OLW for the new school year is going to be “brave.”

  8. Judy C. says:

    Always a bit scary when the deer (or other wildlife) come out of the woods, seemingly not paying attention. I always breathe a sign of relief as I slowly pass by and pray that the deer will turn the other way. I like how you tied your thoughts together.

  9. I always worry when I see any kind of wildlife along the road. I saw it but will the next driver also see it? Will it get across the road safely? How did it get separated for the others? These thoughts do tend to linger a bit before my thoughts return to where they were before the encounter.

  10. Very interesting how your protective, nurturing self took over when you spotted the deer. And then carried over to your later thoughts about nurturing the participants in your workshop by thinking about pushing them beyond their safety zone. Nurturing can take so many forms…love the slice!

Thanks for taking time to comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s